A summary of tax changes from April 2018

Changes to tax and NIC from April 2018

MTD

From the beginning of April 2018 the personal tax allowance will increase to £11,850 per year.   Tax rates will be:

England and Wales
Basic rate 20% On the next £34,500 above the personal tax allowance
Higher rate 40% On £34,501 to £150,000 (the personal allowance reduces once earnings reach £100,000)
Additional rate On earnings above £150,000

 

Scottish rates and bands

On the 20 February 2018 the Scottish Parliament set the following income tax rates and bands for 2018/19.

Bands Band name Rates (%)
Over £11,850*-£13,850 Starter Rate 19
Over £13,850-£24,000 Basic Rate 20
Over £24,000-£43,430 Intermediate Rate 21
Over £43,430-£150,000** Higher Rate 41
Above £150,000** Top Rate 46
Tax on Dividends

The dividend allowance of £5,000 at 0% personal income tax, will reduce to £2,000 per year from April 2018.  Shareholders will be worse off by £225, £975 or £1,143 a year depending on whether they pay tax at the basic rate, higher rate or the additional rate.   Dividend tax rates have not changed, and the rate of tax on dividends remains at 7.5% for basic rate taxpayers, 32.5% above the higher rate threshold and 38.1% for those in the additional rate band (ie. Earning over £150,000).    For many owner-directors, the dividend/salary split will still be the most tax efficient method of remuneration, but it may not suit all.

Corporation tax remains at 19%

National Insurance

Self-employed people will continue to pay Class 4 and Class 2 National Insurance Contributions (NIC).  The abolition of Class 2 NIC was scheduled for this April, but it has been delayed until April 2019.  Class 4 NIC will be 9% on profits over £8,424. Class 2 NIC will be £2.95 per week, to be added to your 2018/19 tax bill as one total for the tax year.

Other changes

The national living and minimum wage rates increase from 1st April 2018 to:

Category of worker Hourly rate
Aged 25 and above (national living wage rate) £7.83
Aged 21 to 24 inclusive £7.38
Aged 18 to 20 inclusive £5.90
Aged under 18 (but above compulsory school leaving age) £4.20
Apprentices aged under 19 £3.70
Apprentices aged 19 and over, but in the first year of their apprenticeship £3.70
Pension Contributions

Minimum auto-enrolment (workplace pension) contributions have been 1% from both the employee and employer.  From 1st April this changes to 3% contributions paid by the employee, and 2% paid by the employer.  This will change again in April 2019.

GDPR

Something not directly related to tax and accountancy, but that will affect all businesses will be the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  This is a fairly significant upgrade from the Data Protection Act 1998, which just wasn’t sufficient for the online environment that we use now.  The GDPR comes into effect from 25th May 2018.  There is no exemption for small business, and fines for non-compliance will be from 4% of turnover.

Businesses complying with the DPA 1998 shouldn’t have too much trouble preparing for 25th May, but assessing the data you hold, documenting what you do with it, rewriting policies and communicating with data subjects (customers, suppliers, employees) can be time consuming.   The ICO website is a good place to start, if you’ve not already looked at this.

Making tax Digital (MTD)

Making tax digital (aka quarterly accounting), has been delayed for a couple of years.  It will start for VAT only from April 2019.  The new rules will encompass VAT registered businesses with a turnover above the VAT threshold (currently £85,000)  From 1st April 2019 records will need to be kept using ‘functional, compatible’ software. Compatible meaning it must be able to upload information direct to HMRC each quarter.

MTD for income tax, corporation tax etc. will follow after 2019.  It will mean 5 updates to HMRC being made each year, instead of the one annual tax return.  There will be an obligation to keep records electronically.  You’ll upload sales, expenses and profit figures each quarter, then a 5th report (if necessary) will be used to claim allowances and reliefs that are not included in normal day-to-day bookkeeping.

The well-known software companies are developing solutions, as well as some of the lesser known software houses. HMRC has said it will not be providing free software, as it currently does for both VAT and personal self-assessment tax returns.

This is a very brief summary, and there could be many other factors to consider in your own business. If you’d like any help with your tax, bookkeeping or accountancy, please get in touch.

Tax changes from April 2016

Tax changes from April 2016 – what’s new?

There are many changes being implemented in UK taxation and accounting rules this year.  This is a very brief summary aimed at owners of small businesses, sole traders and sole directors.

Personal tax allowances and tax bands

  • The income tax personal allowance increases to £11,000 and the basic rate limit increases to £43,000.
  • Married couples’ can share part of their allowance, for low income families.
  • Income tax remains at 20% (basic rate) 40% (higher rate) and 45% (upper rate).
  • The capital gains tax (CGT) exempt amount is £11,100.
  • CGT rates remain at 18% (basic rate taxpayers) 28% (higher rate taxpayers).

Savings

  • There is a 0% savings tax band of £5,000 and a new 0% personal savings allowance of £1,000 for basic rate payers and £500 for higher rate payers.
  • There is a new range of ISAs savings including a right to buy ISA and it is anticipated a crowdfunding ISA will be launched.

Dividends

  • A new tax regime for dividends begins from April 2016.
  • Dividends will be taxed at 0% for the first £5,000, then 7.5% (basic rate), 32.5% (higher rate) and 38.1% (upper rate).

Employers

  • The compulsory National Living Wage (NLW) is being introduced from 1 April 2016. It is the legally required minimum level of pay for workers aged 25 and over.  The penalty for failure to pay either the NLW or the NMW of these will also increase from 100% of the underpayment to 200% of the underpayment on 1 April 2016.
  • National Minimum Wage increases have been announced for October 2016.Age 25 and over: £7.20 – (This is the National Living Wage effective from April 2016 and so will not increase in October 2016)Age 21 – 24: from £6.70 to £6.95

    Age 18 – 20: from £5.30 to £5.55

    Age 16 – 17: from £3.87 to £4.00

    Apprentice rate: from £3.30 to £3.40

    Please note – from 2017 the date for all minimum wage increase will be changed from October to April each year. This is to bring National Minimum Wage increases in line with National Living Wage increases.

 

Trivial Benefits

There will be a new exemption from income tax and national insurance for trivial benefits up to £50, with an annual cap of £300 for office holders of close companies and their families or households.   The exemption is an ‘all or nothing’ exemption: if the value of the benefit is £60 then the full amount of £60 is taxable, not just the £10 excess.   Examples of trivial benefits include things like birthday/wedding/Christmas gifts and workplace refreshments (coffee, tea, biscuits).

 

Workplace Pensions

Auto-enrolment continues to be rolled out. This is a compulsory change for everyone paying workers, and there are strict deadlines and procedures to meet.  I have arranged for a cost-effective solution for my payroll clients, and will be speaking to everyone in due course. If you process your own payroll, make sure you check your staging date on the Pensions Regulator website, and start preparing in plenty of time.

RTI (real time information)

The temporary relaxation in RTI reporting for micro employers will end as planned on 5 April 2016. The concession allowing employers to submit returns up to three days late without being subject to late filing penalties is withdrawn.

National Insurance

From 6th April there will be no Employers’ NIC on wages paid to apprentices aged under 25 or employees under 21 earning up to the Upper Earnings Limit of £43,000.

The Employers’ NICs allowance increases to £3,000 but is no longer available for companies where the sole director is the only employee.

 

 

For more information on any of the above please get in touch.

 

 

RTI, pension auto-enrolment and minimum wage 2012

RTI. Auto-enrolment to pension schemes.  An increase to the minimum wage.

There have been a few changes in the news recently. The important ones for employers are the changes to national minimum wage, the introduction of RTI reporting, and the introduction of automatic enrollment of workers to pension schemes.

National Minimum Wage

From 1st October 2012 the minimum wage rates are:

  • £6.19 an hour for workers aged 21 and over (an increase of 11p)
  • £4.98 an hour for workers aged 18-20
  • £3.68 an hour for workers aged below 18 who are no longer of compulsory school age
  • £2.65 per hour for apprentices under 19, and 19 or over in their first year of apprenticeship

Payroll changes – RTI

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is changing the way employers report tax and national insurance (NIC) liability.  Currently, you (or your payroll provider), calculate tax and NIC on a regular basis. You pay your employees their net wage or salary. You then pay the tax and NIC to HMRC monthly or quarterly.  At the end of the tax year, a P35 report is filed with HMRC.  The P35 confirms the amounts of tax each employee has paid, and the total tax and NIC deducted and paid to HMRC by the employer.

Under the new system – RTI (real time information) employers send a report to HMRC when every payroll run is completed.   Each report will contain employees’ personal and payment details.  So there will no longer be a year-end return to file.  HMRC will no longer require P46s and P45s to be filed, but you will still need the same information from starters and must give P45 information to leavers.

To prepare for the change you’ll need to make sure your software can file RTI reports, and check that all of your employee details are accurate.  If you use a payroll provider, or bureau, they should handle the change for you.

The payroll software that we use is fully compliant with the new regime, so clients can expect to see little difference in the work they need to do.

More information is on HM Revenue and Customs website, or please contact us for help with your payroll.

Pension Auto-enrolment

The introduction of compulsory pension schemes for jobholders has been in the news recently.  Currently only large companies must make sure all eligible workers are enrolled onto a qualifying pension scheme.  It will be extended to all employers by 2017.

Employers will have to deduct a proportion of the jobholder’s pay, and make an additional employer contribution.

The dates from which employers must start (the staging date), depend on the number of employees you have and your PAYE reference.  More information what you need to do, when you’ll need to do it, and what you must not do, can be found on the Pensions Regulator website:

When the time comes to set up your scheme, please talk to an independent financial advisor to find the most cost effective scheme for you and your workers.  If you would like help in finding a good financial advisor please contact us.